New Featured Article!

“Systematic Review of Recent Social Indicator Efforts in US Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems (2000–2016)”

February 21, 2018

The latest Environment and Society featured article is now available! This month’s article—”Systematic Review of Recent Social Indicator Efforts in US Coastal and Ocean Ecosystems (2000–2016)”—comes from Volume 8 (2017). In their article, Victoria C. Ramenzoni and David Yoskowitz discuss the major rationale underpinning governmental efforts, after Hurricanes Sandy and Katrina, to quantify social impacts, resilience, and community adaptation , as well as the limitations and conflicts encountered in transitioning research to policy and application

Visit the featured article page to download your copy of the article today before it’s gone! A new article is featured every month.

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Hope for “Just Resilience” on Earth Day

April 22, 2016

Nathan Jessee

This post is presented in this week’s series recognizing Earth Day, Friday, April 22.

This Is Trauma
“This is trauma,” suggested one facilitator as the sun set over a planning meeting for the Isle de Jean Charles band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe – Lowlander Center Resettlement held in January of this year. In a community space raised high above the banks of Bayou Pointe-Au-Chien, a handful of teenagers, adults, and elders from the Isle de Jean Charles band of Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw Tribe had spent the last hour sharing their experiences of storms, flooding, displacement, disrupted community, and racism mediated by environmental crises and the official responses to them.
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Socio-Environmental Disasters and Resilience Approaches

November 30, 2015

Jerry K. Jacka

In April 2015, the rains stopped coming to the New Guinea Highlands—a result of the current El Niño impacting the planet. A few months later in August, the inevitable frosts arrived that also accompany El Niños. What few crops were struggling to survive in people’s gardens were utterly decimated by the frosts, for while people garden in the highlands up to 2,800 meters above sea level, the crops they grow are mostly adapted to lowland tropical environments. The staples of the highlands—sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta)—cannot be stored; therefore, the inability to continually plant and harvest staple crops poses food insecurity for almost 2 million people in Papua New Guinea (PNG).
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